Discussion:
Day at the seaside
(too old to reply)
Norcot
2006-07-15 06:40:51 UTC
Permalink
Well, we had a good day at the seaside.---( for the semantically challenged
we were at the side of a sea, the North Sea and there was no beach as we sat
on top of the Hunstanton cliffs and had lunch with the sea pounding the base
of the cliffs and no beach in sight. Beach :- an area of sand gravel, mud
etc covered and uncovered as the tide comes in and goes out) The weather
was good with a nice cooling easterly wind. The picnic, which we packed
ourselves, was excellent and the company was first class. Even the traffic
was light as the schools had not yet broken up for the summer holidays (
Note; not summer recess, we are in England). I can recommend a good, old
fashionned, English, day at the seaside. I slept like a log last night.

Rex.
The Traveller
2006-07-15 07:31:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Well, we had a good day at the seaside.---( for the semantically challenged
we were at the side of a sea, the North Sea and there was no beach as we sat
on top of the Hunstanton cliffs and had lunch with the sea pounding the base
of the cliffs and no beach in sight. Beach :- an area of sand gravel, mud
etc covered and uncovered as the tide comes in and goes out) The weather
was good with a nice cooling easterly wind. The picnic, which we packed
ourselves, was excellent and the company was first class. Even the traffic
was light as the schools had not yet broken up for the summer holidays (
Note; not summer recess, we are in England). I can recommend a good, old
fashionned, English, day at the seaside. I slept like a log last night.
Rex.
Lol. If you didn't dip your toes, you haven't been there :oP

Edith Commenting.
sleepalot
2006-07-15 07:40:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by Norcot
Well, we had a good day at the seaside.---( for the semantically
challenged
Post by Norcot
we were at the side of a sea, the North Sea and there was no beach as we
sat
Post by Norcot
on top of the Hunstanton cliffs and had lunch with the sea pounding the
base
Post by Norcot
of the cliffs and no beach in sight. Beach :- an area of sand gravel, mud
etc covered and uncovered as the tide comes in and goes out) The weather
was good with a nice cooling easterly wind. The picnic, which we packed
ourselves, was excellent and the company was first class. Even the traffic
was light as the schools had not yet broken up for the summer holidays (
Note; not summer recess, we are in England). I can recommend a good, old
fashionned, English, day at the seaside.
I slept like a log last night.
So your top half was dry then.
Post by Norcot
Lol. If you didn't dip your toes, you haven't been there :oP
Edith Commenting.
Being on top of the cliffs when the tide was in, he didn't
see anything either. ;-)
The Traveller
2006-07-15 07:54:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by sleepalot
Post by Norcot
Post by Norcot
Well, we had a good day at the seaside.---( for the semantically
challenged
Post by Norcot
we were at the side of a sea, the North Sea and there was no beach as we
sat
Post by Norcot
on top of the Hunstanton cliffs and had lunch with the sea pounding the
base
Post by Norcot
of the cliffs and no beach in sight. Beach :- an area of sand gravel, mud
etc covered and uncovered as the tide comes in and goes out) The weather
was good with a nice cooling easterly wind. The picnic, which we packed
ourselves, was excellent and the company was first class. Even the traffic
was light as the schools had not yet broken up for the summer holidays (
Note; not summer recess, we are in England). I can recommend a good, old
fashionned, English, day at the seaside.
I slept like a log last night.
So your top half was dry then.
Post by Norcot
Lol. If you didn't dip your toes, you haven't been there :oP
Edith Commenting.
Being on top of the cliffs when the tide was in, he didn't
see anything either. ;-)
He has bad eyesight too :)) Let's hope his huevos were hard boiled.

Edith.
sleepalot
2006-07-15 08:07:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Let's hope his huevos were hard boiled.
Ouch!
The Traveller
2006-07-15 08:47:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Let's hope his huevos were hard boiled.
Ouch!
I meant the ones in his sandwiches. You don't think he can put tuthers
between two slices of bread, do you? Anyhow, hard boiled, he could throw
them ovver t'cliff.

Edith-impressed.
Norcot
2006-07-15 08:57:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by The Traveller
Let's hope his huevos were hard boiled.
Ouch!
I meant the ones in his sandwiches. You don't think he can put tuthers
between two slices of bread, do you? Anyhow, hard boiled, he could throw
them ovver t'cliff.
Edith-impressed.
Trust you to lower the tone.

Rex.
The Traveller
2006-07-15 09:11:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by The Traveller
Post by The Traveller
Let's hope his huevos were hard boiled.
Ouch!
I meant the ones in his sandwiches. You don't think he can put tuthers
between two slices of bread, do you? Anyhow, hard boiled, he could throw
them ovver t'cliff.
Edith-impressed.
Trust you to lower the tone.
Rex.
Actually, one couldn't. It was such a nice post and you seemed to have a
really nice time. Can I help it if I am envious, eh? Eh? Huh!

Edith-Jam sandwich und a cuppa Tetley's.
a l l y
2006-07-15 09:53:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by The Traveller
Let's hope his huevos were hard boiled.
Ouch!
I meant the ones in his sandwiches. You don't think he can put tuthers
between two slices of bread, do you? Anyhow, hard boiled, he could throw
them ovver t'cliff.
The seagulls would catch them in mid-air.

ally
Jpinny
2006-07-15 14:42:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by The Traveller
Let's hope his huevos were hard boiled.
Ouch!
I meant the ones in his sandwiches. You don't think he can put tuthers
between two slices of bread, do you? Anyhow, hard boiled, he could throw
them ovver t'cliff.
Edith-impressed.
You've just given me an idea for lunch. Sandwiches like I used to take
to Silloth or Ravenglass on the School Trip. Tomato, or egg, or banana.
I'll make a tray of them, with some ham and tuna, too.

Jp
Norcot
2006-07-15 15:08:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by The Traveller
Let's hope his huevos were hard boiled.
Ouch!
I meant the ones in his sandwiches. You don't think he can put tuthers
between two slices of bread, do you? Anyhow, hard boiled, he could throw
them ovver t'cliff.
Edith-impressed.
You've just given me an idea for lunch. Sandwiches like I used to take to
Silloth or Ravenglass on the School Trip. Tomato, or egg, or banana. I'll
make a tray of them, with some ham and tuna, too.
Jp
One of my personal favourites, a crusty, buttered roll with sliced English
tomatoes sprinkled with salt and a tiny amount of malt vinegar. When I first
left school I worked for a large market garden and looked after the
greenhouses of tomatoes. There is nothing like a freshly picked tomato,
straight of the vine. With salt and bread and butter.

Rex.
a l l y
2006-07-15 20:07:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
One of my personal favourites, a crusty, buttered roll with sliced English
tomatoes sprinkled with salt and a tiny amount of malt vinegar. When I
first left school I worked for a large market garden and looked after the
greenhouses of tomatoes. There is nothing like a freshly picked tomato,
straight of the vine. With salt and bread and butter.
We've grown our own once or twice, and once you've tasted fresh tomatoes
nothing else is good enough. Ours sometimes never reached the kitchen. It
was off the vine and straight into my mouth. Who need salt and stuff?

ally
Jpinny
2006-07-15 21:05:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Norcot
One of my personal favourites, a crusty, buttered roll with sliced English
tomatoes sprinkled with salt and a tiny amount of malt vinegar. When I
first left school I worked for a large market garden and looked after the
greenhouses of tomatoes. There is nothing like a freshly picked tomato,
straight of the vine. With salt and bread and butter.
We've grown our own once or twice, and once you've tasted fresh tomatoes
nothing else is good enough. Ours sometimes never reached the kitchen. It
was off the vine and straight into my mouth. Who need salt and stuff?
ally
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!

Jp
a l l y
2006-07-15 22:19:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jpinny
Post by a l l y
Post by Norcot
One of my personal favourites, a crusty, buttered roll with sliced
English tomatoes sprinkled with salt and a tiny amount of malt vinegar.
When I first left school I worked for a large market garden and looked
after the greenhouses of tomatoes. There is nothing like a freshly
picked tomato, straight of the vine. With salt and bread and butter.
We've grown our own once or twice, and once you've tasted fresh tomatoes
nothing else is good enough. Ours sometimes never reached the kitchen. It
was off the vine and straight into my mouth. Who need salt and stuff?
ally
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Ooh yummy. And you can grow them outside there! The reason I stopped growing
them in the conservatory was the infestation of wee flies that seemed to
surround the fruit. I really didn't want to start spraying nasty pesticides
on them, and couldn't get rid of them any other way. Hopefully this won't be
such a problem out of doors.

My pal's mum always used to describe the smell of tomatoes as "cat's wash".

ally
Ian Dainty
2006-07-16 09:02:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Ooh yummy. And you can grow them outside there! The reason I stopped growing
them in the conservatory was the infestation of wee flies
In the absence of Lou I shall have to make my own comment here. If you
wee'd in the toilet like everyone else perhaps you wouldn't be infected
by wee flies in your conservatory.

Toilet humour regards,

Ian.

ps...... sorry!
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
a l l y
2006-07-16 12:08:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Dainty
Post by a l l y
Ooh yummy. And you can grow them outside there! The reason I stopped growing
them in the conservatory was the infestation of wee flies
In the absence of Lou I shall have to make my own comment here. If you
wee'd in the toilet like everyone else perhaps you wouldn't be infected
by wee flies in your conservatory.
...and how we've missed you and Lou.

...not...

So how's life in the flat country, then?

ally
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:08:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Ian Dainty
Post by a l l y
Ooh yummy. And you can grow them outside there! The reason I stopped growing
them in the conservatory was the infestation of wee flies
In the absence of Lou I shall have to make my own comment here. If you
wee'd in the toilet like everyone else perhaps you wouldn't be infected
by wee flies in your conservatory.
...and how we've missed you and Lou.
...not...
So how's life in the flat country, then?
ally
So-How's life in the flat country then, Ian?

Edith.
D'you think we'll get an answer, Ally?
a l l y
2006-07-17 08:16:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by a l l y
So how's life in the flat country, then?
ally
So-How's life in the flat country then, Ian?
Edith.
D'you think we'll get an answer, Ally?
Hmnph. I think he's off again.

ally
The Traveller
2006-07-17 08:42:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by The Traveller
Post by a l l y
So how's life in the flat country, then?
ally
So-How's life in the flat country then, Ian?
Edith.
D'you think we'll get an answer, Ally?
Hmnph. I think he's off again.
ally
Shame on him

Edith
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:07:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Dainty
Post by a l l y
Ooh yummy. And you can grow them outside there! The reason I stopped growing
them in the conservatory was the infestation of wee flies
In the absence of Lou I shall have to make my own comment here. If you
wee'd in the toilet like everyone else perhaps you wouldn't be infected
by wee flies in your conservatory.
Toilet humour regards,
Ian.
ps...... sorry!
Wees and dumps. That's out ian for you. As for little flies. Buy a sun dew
plant.

Edith Bigideas.
a l l y
2006-07-17 08:17:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Ian Dainty
Post by a l l y
Ooh yummy. And you can grow them outside there! The reason I stopped
growing
Post by Ian Dainty
Post by a l l y
them in the conservatory was the infestation of wee flies
In the absence of Lou I shall have to make my own comment here. If you
wee'd in the toilet like everyone else perhaps you wouldn't be infected
by wee flies in your conservatory.
Toilet humour regards,
Ian.
ps...... sorry!
Wees and dumps. That's out ian for you. As for little flies. Buy a sun dew
plant.
Not a bad idea, but it would have ended up a very fat sundew plant, feeding
on that colony of tomato flies!

ally
The Traveller
2006-07-17 08:40:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by a l l y
Post by Ian Dainty
Post by a l l y
Ooh yummy. And you can grow them outside there! The reason I stopped
growing
Post by Ian Dainty
Post by a l l y
them in the conservatory was the infestation of wee flies
In the absence of Lou I shall have to make my own comment here. If you
wee'd in the toilet like everyone else perhaps you wouldn't be infected
by wee flies in your conservatory.
Toilet humour regards,
Ian.
ps...... sorry!
Wees and dumps. That's our Ian for you. As for little flies. Buy a sun
dew
Post by a l l y
Post by a l l y
plant.
Not a bad idea, but it would have ended up a very fat sundew plant, feeding
on that colony of tomato flies!
ally
The bigger, the better, they say. Actually....errrrm.

Edith lost for words.
Norcot
2006-07-17 08:51:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by The Traveller
Wees and dumps. That's out ian for you. As for little flies. Buy a sun dew
plant.
Not a bad idea, but it would have ended up a very fat sundew plant,
feeding on that colony of tomato flies!
ally
Or dead! You can overdo it with them.

Rex
Jpinny
2006-07-16 15:37:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Jpinny
Post by a l l y
Post by Norcot
One of my personal favourites, a crusty, buttered roll with sliced
English tomatoes sprinkled with salt and a tiny amount of malt vinegar.
When I first left school I worked for a large market garden and looked
after the greenhouses of tomatoes. There is nothing like a freshly
picked tomato, straight of the vine. With salt and bread and butter.
We've grown our own once or twice, and once you've tasted fresh tomatoes
nothing else is good enough. Ours sometimes never reached the kitchen. It
was off the vine and straight into my mouth. Who need salt and stuff?
ally
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Ooh yummy. And you can grow them outside there! The reason I stopped growing
them in the conservatory was the infestation of wee flies that seemed to
surround the fruit. I really didn't want to start spraying nasty pesticides
on them, and couldn't get rid of them any other way. Hopefully this won't be
such a problem out of doors.
My pal's mum always used to describe the smell of tomatoes as "cat's wash".
ally
I'm just a beginner, so I'm not at all sure what infestations might
occur. So far, there's nothing on mine. The tomatoes are growing between
my lavender and mint. I know that aphids hate lavender, maybe that's it.

Jp
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:11:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jpinny
Post by a l l y
Post by Jpinny
Post by a l l y
Post by Norcot
One of my personal favourites, a crusty, buttered roll with sliced
English tomatoes sprinkled with salt and a tiny amount of malt vinegar.
When I first left school I worked for a large market garden and looked
after the greenhouses of tomatoes. There is nothing like a freshly
picked tomato, straight of the vine. With salt and bread and butter.
We've grown our own once or twice, and once you've tasted fresh tomatoes
nothing else is good enough. Ours sometimes never reached the kitchen. It
was off the vine and straight into my mouth. Who need salt and stuff?
ally
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Ooh yummy. And you can grow them outside there! The reason I stopped growing
them in the conservatory was the infestation of wee flies that seemed to
surround the fruit. I really didn't want to start spraying nasty pesticides
on them, and couldn't get rid of them any other way. Hopefully this won't be
such a problem out of doors.
My pal's mum always used to describe the smell of tomatoes as "cat's wash".
ally
I'm just a beginner, so I'm not at all sure what infestations might
occur. So far, there's nothing on mine. The tomatoes are growing between
my lavender and mint. I know that aphids hate lavender, maybe that's it.
Jp
I suppose, just don't over water them, Jp, the way I do with all my plants,
that are now out on my wonderful ....wait for it...verandas.

Edith Sundew girl.
Alfred Packer
2006-07-16 16:28:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Jpinny
Post by a l l y
Post by Norcot
One of my personal favourites, a crusty, buttered roll with sliced
English tomatoes sprinkled with salt and a tiny amount of malt
vinegar. When I first left school I worked for a large market
garden and looked after the greenhouses of tomatoes. There is
nothing like a freshly picked tomato, straight of the vine. With
salt and bread and butter.
We've grown our own once or twice, and once you've tasted fresh
tomatoes nothing else is good enough. Ours sometimes never reached
the kitchen. It was off the vine and straight into my mouth. Who
need salt and stuff? ally
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in
the corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the
fragrance is wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Ooh yummy. And you can grow them outside there! The reason I stopped
growing them in the conservatory was the infestation of wee flies
that seemed to surround the fruit. I really didn't want to start
spraying nasty pesticides on them, and couldn't get rid of them any
other way. Hopefully this won't be such a problem out of doors.
My pal's mum always used to describe the smell of tomatoes as "cat's wash".
ally
used to be able to grow them outside in Cumberland. One of the earliest
photos that exists of Al has him making tomato soup in his bucket in the
back garden. No tomatoes for the salad in '48.

This years crop are chery tomatoes which we've been eating for the last two
months or so. In years past if the autumn is mild we can get a second crop.
In 1978 we had home grown tomatoes off the vine on Xmas day.

Al




----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
a l l y
2006-07-16 19:48:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alfred Packer
used to be able to grow them outside in Cumberland. One of the earliest
photos that exists of Al has him making tomato soup in his bucket in the
back garden. No tomatoes for the salad in '48.
This years crop are chery tomatoes which we've been eating for the last
two months or so. In years past if the autumn is mild we can get a second
crop. In 1978 we had home grown tomatoes off the vine on Xmas day.
I've heard about varieties that are hardy outside, actually. Don't know if
they'd cope with the Solway winds, but if we found a sheltered spot it might
be worth a try.

ally
Alfred Packer
2006-07-16 20:05:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Alfred Packer
used to be able to grow them outside in Cumberland. One of the earliest
photos that exists of Al has him making tomato soup in his bucket in the
back garden. No tomatoes for the salad in '48.
This years crop are chery tomatoes which we've been eating for the last
two months or so. In years past if the autumn is mild we can get a
second crop. In 1978 we had home grown tomatoes off the vine on Xmas day.
I've heard about varieties that are hardy outside, actually. Don't know if
they'd cope with the Solway winds, but if we found a sheltered spot it
might be worth a try.
ally
the 1947 crop, grown at Burgh by Sands, grew close to the wall facing south
and were sheltered on the west by a trellis and on the east by a flight of
steps.

Al




----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
a l l y
2006-07-16 22:37:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alfred Packer
Post by a l l y
I've heard about varieties that are hardy outside, actually. Don't know
if they'd cope with the Solway winds, but if we found a sheltered spot it
might be worth a try.
ally
the 1947 crop, grown at Burgh by Sands, grew close to the wall facing
south and were sheltered on the west by a trellis and on the east by a
flight of steps.
Hmm.. Might be similar spots in our front garden, facing south-ish and away
from the sea. Might be worth a try next year.

ally
Alfred Packer
2006-07-17 01:40:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Alfred Packer
Post by a l l y
I've heard about varieties that are hardy outside, actually. Don't
know if they'd cope with the Solway winds, but if we found a
sheltered spot it might be worth a try.
ally
the 1947 crop, grown at Burgh by Sands, grew close to the wall facing
south and were sheltered on the west by a trellis and on the east by
a flight of steps.
Hmm.. Might be similar spots in our front garden, facing south-ish
and away from the sea. Might be worth a try next year.
ally
might be important to mention the wall was white washed thus reflecting some
heat/light.

Al




----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
a l l y
2006-07-17 08:19:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alfred Packer
Post by a l l y
Post by Alfred Packer
Post by a l l y
I've heard about varieties that are hardy outside, actually. Don't
know if they'd cope with the Solway winds, but if we found a
sheltered spot it might be worth a try.
ally
the 1947 crop, grown at Burgh by Sands, grew close to the wall facing
south and were sheltered on the west by a trellis and on the east by
a flight of steps.
Hmm.. Might be similar spots in our front garden, facing south-ish
and away from the sea. Might be worth a try next year.
ally
might be important to mention the wall was white washed thus reflecting
some heat/light.
I can think of a corner in our front garden that would work, if I could be
bothered removing all the junk that's growing there at the moment and
whitewashing the old brick wall behind it. It's full of 15ft weeds - you
know, small trees that arent' really supposed to be there.

ally-too-busy-to-garden
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:16:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Alfred Packer
used to be able to grow them outside in Cumberland. One of the earliest
photos that exists of Al has him making tomato soup in his bucket in the
back garden. No tomatoes for the salad in '48.
This years crop are chery tomatoes which we've been eating for the last
two months or so. In years past if the autumn is mild we can get a second
crop. In 1978 we had home grown tomatoes off the vine on Xmas day.
I've heard about varieties that are hardy outside, actually. Don't know if
they'd cope with the Solway winds, but if we found a sheltered spot it might
be worth a try.
ally
I'd say a greenhouse would be the thing, Ally. A fella oop at Westfield grew
'is own tomatos in 'is green'ouse and me Mam used tuh buy a few off 'im.
They were scruumshus. After eat'n th'm, nowt else wuz good inuuf.

Edith Wuukiton Dialect.
a l l y
2006-07-17 08:22:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
I'd say a greenhouse would be the thing, Ally. A fella oop at Westfield grew
'is own tomatos in 'is green'ouse and me Mam used tuh buy a few off 'im.
They were scruumshus. After eat'n th'm, nowt else wuz good inuuf.
Oh well, yes, in a greenhouse you can grow all sorts of stuff. But a
greenhouse is a big commitment, not just money-wise but also the amount of
time you need to have spare to spend working in it. Considering that this
year we've hardly time to mow the grass, and for 2 winters we've never got
round to digging the veg patch, I suspect time is something we just haven't
got. Fancy coming over and being our live-in gardener, Edith? I could set up
a nice wee flat for you in the barn.

ally
The Traveller
2006-07-17 08:34:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by The Traveller
I'd say a greenhouse would be the thing, Ally. A fella oop at Westfield grew
'is own tomatos in 'is green'ouse and me Mam used tuh buy a few off 'im.
They were scruumshus. After eat'n th'm, nowt else wuz good inuuf.
Oh well, yes, in a greenhouse you can grow all sorts of stuff. But a
greenhouse is a big commitment, not just money-wise but also the amount of
time you need to have spare to spend working in it. Considering that this
year we've hardly time to mow the grass, and for 2 winters we've never got
round to digging the veg patch, I suspect time is something we just haven't
got. Fancy coming over and being our live-in gardener, Edith? I could set up
a nice wee flat for you in the barn.
ally
Only if it the flat has a washing machine and a motorized lawn mower.

Edith on Commotion - opps! I mean Condition. Oh, I mean - Commision. I knew
I meant something.
Norcot
2006-07-17 07:20:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Alfred Packer
used to be able to grow them outside in Cumberland. One of the earliest
photos that exists of Al has him making tomato soup in his bucket in the
back garden. No tomatoes for the salad in '48.
This years crop are chery tomatoes which we've been eating for the last
two months or so. In years past if the autumn is mild we can get a
second crop. In 1978 we had home grown tomatoes off the vine on Xmas day.
I've heard about varieties that are hardy outside, actually. Don't know if
they'd cope with the Solway winds, but if we found a sheltered spot it
might be worth a try.
ally
We used to grow them outdoors up a cane, with four canes placed around them
and a plastic bag over the top. A sort of mini greenhouse.

Rex
The Traveller
2006-07-17 08:21:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by a l l y
Post by Alfred Packer
used to be able to grow them outside in Cumberland. One of the earliest
photos that exists of Al has him making tomato soup in his bucket in the
back garden. No tomatoes for the salad in '48.
This years crop are chery tomatoes which we've been eating for the last
two months or so. In years past if the autumn is mild we can get a
second crop. In 1978 we had home grown tomatoes off the vine on Xmas day.
I've heard about varieties that are hardy outside, actually. Don't know if
they'd cope with the Solway winds, but if we found a sheltered spot it
might be worth a try.
ally
We used to grow them outdoors up a cane, with four canes placed around them
and a plastic bag over the top. A sort of mini greenhouse.
Rex
Smart. I used my old windows to build a greenhouse. It was only a 'one year'
thingie thou.

Edith No patience.
Norcot
2006-07-17 08:57:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Smart. I used my old windows to build a greenhouse. It was only a 'one year'
thingie thou.
Edith No patience.
When I managed Boots in Uppingham we had a refit and removed all the old
glazed mahogany cupboard doors. I built my first greenhouse out of those.
Must have been the poshest greenhouse in Uppingham. In those days I grew
toms, cucumbers mellons and lots of pot plants.

Rex.

a l l y
2006-07-17 08:23:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by a l l y
Post by Alfred Packer
used to be able to grow them outside in Cumberland. One of the earliest
photos that exists of Al has him making tomato soup in his bucket in the
back garden. No tomatoes for the salad in '48.
This years crop are chery tomatoes which we've been eating for the last
two months or so. In years past if the autumn is mild we can get a
second crop. In 1978 we had home grown tomatoes off the vine on Xmas day.
I've heard about varieties that are hardy outside, actually. Don't know
if they'd cope with the Solway winds, but if we found a sheltered spot it
might be worth a try.
ally
We used to grow them outdoors up a cane, with four canes placed around
them and a plastic bag over the top. A sort of mini greenhouse.
First gust of wind and the plastic bag would be off and on its way to
Scotland, I fear. You need something more substantial around here!

ally
Norcot
2006-07-17 08:50:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Norcot
We used to grow them outdoors up a cane, with four canes placed around
them and a plastic bag over the top. A sort of mini greenhouse.
First gust of wind and the plastic bag would be off and on its way to
Scotland, I fear. You need something more substantial around here!
ally
Ah! That is a problem if you live on windy corner.

Rex
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:05:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Jpinny
Post by a l l y
Post by Norcot
One of my personal favourites, a crusty, buttered roll with sliced
English tomatoes sprinkled with salt and a tiny amount of malt vinegar.
When I first left school I worked for a large market garden and looked
after the greenhouses of tomatoes. There is nothing like a freshly
picked tomato, straight of the vine. With salt and bread and butter.
We've grown our own once or twice, and once you've tasted fresh tomatoes
nothing else is good enough. Ours sometimes never reached the kitchen. It
was off the vine and straight into my mouth. Who need salt and stuff?
ally
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Ooh yummy. And you can grow them outside there! The reason I stopped growing
them in the conservatory was the infestation of wee flies that seemed to
surround the fruit. I really didn't want to start spraying nasty pesticides
on them, and couldn't get rid of them any other way. Hopefully this won't be
such a problem out of doors.
My pal's mum always used to describe the smell of tomatoes as "cat's wash".
ally
That's it. I took the middles out of the tomatos and planted them in
february, in pots in the kitchen. Right enough I got tomato plants that I
couldn't plant outside until late June. I went barmey with the stink of
them. No more home made tomatos for me, thank you.

Edith.
Norcot
2006-07-16 07:09:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jpinny
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Jp
When you've handled them a lot you get yellow fingers - especially with
soap.

Rex
The Traveller
2006-07-16 07:29:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by Jpinny
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Jp
When you've handled them a lot you get yellow fingers - especially with
soap.
Rex
Congratulations Jp.

My flowers have mildews on them this year. I've sprayed them.

Edith
Jpinny
2006-07-16 15:19:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by Norcot
Post by Jpinny
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Jp
When you've handled them a lot you get yellow fingers - especially with
soap.
Rex
Congratulations Jp.
My flowers have mildews on them this year. I've sprayed them.
Edith
Thankyou Edith.

Jp
sleepalot
2006-07-16 15:52:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jpinny
Post by The Traveller
My flowers have mildews on them this year. I've sprayed them.
Thankyou Edith.
Rofl!
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:18:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jpinny
Post by The Traveller
Post by Norcot
Post by Jpinny
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Jp
When you've handled them a lot you get yellow fingers - especially with
soap.
Rex
Congratulations Jp.
My flowers have mildews on them this year. I've sprayed them.
Edith
Thankyou Edith.
Jp
:))))))))n You are very welcome. pet.

Edith.
Ian Dainty
2006-07-16 09:05:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jpinny
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Jp
I'm tired of the supermarkets approach to tomatoes. First there was
tomatoes, then tomatoes on the vine, then Finest tomatoes on the vine.

Why don't they be honest and label them respectively rubbish, ok'ish
and decent tomatoes.

I shall now try to get out more.

Ian.
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
a l l y
2006-07-16 12:09:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Dainty
Post by Jpinny
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Jp
I'm tired of the supermarkets approach to tomatoes. First there was
tomatoes, then tomatoes on the vine, then Finest tomatoes on the vine.
Why don't they be honest and label them respectively rubbish, ok'ish
and decent tomatoes.
You'd think it would cost more to remove them from the vine, rather than
leave them on. The pricing structure's upside down.
Post by Ian Dainty
I shall now try to get out more.
Good idea.

ally
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:19:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Dainty
Post by Jpinny
I am the proud mother-to-be of 6 tiny, (2 to 3cm diameter) new, green
tomatoes and a few more flowers still to go on my very first crop in the
corner of my herb garden! I just went to count them and the fragrance is
wafting up from my fingers on the keyboard!
Jp
I'm tired of the supermarkets approach to tomatoes. First there was
tomatoes, then tomatoes on the vine, then Finest tomatoes on the vine.
Why don't they be honest and label them respectively rubbish, ok'ish
and decent tomatoes.
I shall now try to get out more.
Ian.
If tomatos are the only thing we have on the brain, we all need to get out
more, Ian. Lol. Those great big tomatos have no taste at all.

Edith
Norcot
2006-07-16 09:59:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Norcot
One of my personal favourites, a crusty, buttered roll with sliced
English tomatoes sprinkled with salt and a tiny amount of malt vinegar.
When I first left school I worked for a large market garden and looked
after the greenhouses of tomatoes. There is nothing like a freshly picked
tomato, straight of the vine. With salt and bread and butter.
We've grown our own once or twice, and once you've tasted fresh tomatoes
nothing else is good enough. Ours sometimes never reached the kitchen. It
was off the vine and straight into my mouth. Who need salt and stuff?
ally
Erica grows a couple of tomatoes plants and a couple of cucumber plants
every year in the conservatory. The problem with home grown tomatoes is the
late ripening. By the time ours are fit for eating they are in the shops at
a very cheap price. I used to know a chap who made a wonderful green tomato
chutney because his never ripened in time. It was very reminiscent of
Branston Pickle in flavour, only better.

Rex.
a l l y
2006-07-16 12:10:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Erica grows a couple of tomatoes plants and a couple of cucumber plants
every year in the conservatory. The problem with home grown tomatoes is
the late ripening. By the time ours are fit for eating they are in the
shops at a very cheap price.
Well, yes, but the ones in the shops are tasteless compared to Erica's
home-grown ones, aren't they?

ally
Norcot
2006-07-16 12:31:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by Norcot
Erica grows a couple of tomatoes plants and a couple of cucumber plants
every year in the conservatory. The problem with home grown tomatoes is
the late ripening. By the time ours are fit for eating they are in the
shops at a very cheap price.
Well, yes, but the ones in the shops are tasteless compared to Erica's
home-grown ones, aren't they?
ally
In a word, Yes. I'm not sure which variety she has this year - I think it's
alicanti - but they usually have a lot of flavour.

Rex.
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:22:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by a l l y
Post by Norcot
Erica grows a couple of tomatoes plants and a couple of cucumber plants
every year in the conservatory. The problem with home grown tomatoes is
the late ripening. By the time ours are fit for eating they are in the
shops at a very cheap price.
Well, yes, but the ones in the shops are tasteless compared to Erica's
home-grown ones, aren't they?
ally
In a word, Yes. I'm not sure which variety she has this year - I think it's
alicanti - but they usually have a lot of flavour.
Rex.
The Tomatos of Time. That's the ones I like.

Edith
Norcot
2006-07-17 07:23:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by Norcot
alicanti - but they usually have a lot of flavour.
Rex.
The Tomatos of Time. That's the ones I like.
Edith
Thanks for the free plug, Edith.
Rex
The Traveller
2006-07-17 08:17:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by Norcot
alicanti - but they usually have a lot of flavour.
Rex.
The Tomatos of Time. That's the ones I like.
Edith
Thanks for the free plug, Edith.
Rex
Any tomato time, marra.

Edith.
The Traveller
2006-07-16 07:53:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jpinny
Post by The Traveller
Post by The Traveller
Let's hope his huevos were hard boiled.
Ouch!
I meant the ones in his sandwiches. You don't think he can put tuthers
between two slices of bread, do you? Anyhow, hard boiled, he could throw
them ovver t'cliff.
Edith-impressed.
You've just given me an idea for lunch. Sandwiches like I used to take
to Silloth or Ravenglass on the School Trip. Tomato, or egg, or banana.
I'll make a tray of them, with some ham and tuna, too.
Jp
St. Bees, Ravenglass, Silloth prom. Skinburness. Put a bit o cucumber in,
Jp.

Edith
Ian Dainty
2006-07-16 08:58:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
St. Bees, Ravenglass, Silloth prom. Skinburness. Put a bit o cucumber in,
Jp.
Edith
Ah St Bees.... I'll take you there for a day out Eddy. We could
paddle in the sea. With wellys on. No point taking too many chances.
I'm quite happy with the number of toes I already have and don't
require more. Then I could buy you an ice cream and take you for a
walk up on the cliffs. If you're good, I'll let you lick my lolly.

Traditional seaside regards,

Ian.
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:25:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Dainty
Post by The Traveller
St. Bees, Ravenglass, Silloth prom. Skinburness. Put a bit o cucumber in,
Jp.
Edith
Ah St Bees.... I'll take you there for a day out Eddy. We could
paddle in the sea. With wellys on. No point taking too many chances.
I'm quite happy with the number of toes I already have and don't
require more. Then I could buy you an ice cream and take you for a
walk up on the cliffs. If you're good, I'll let you lick my lolly.
Traditional seaside regards,
Ian.
They don't make lollies like that these days, Ian but I'll come anyhow and
stick to my ice crem de lecha ;)

Edith-Heyopp-Ian's on the loose again.
Jpinny
2006-07-16 15:33:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by Jpinny
You've just given me an idea for lunch. Sandwiches like I used to take
to Silloth or Ravenglass on the School Trip. Tomato, or egg, or banana.
I'll make a tray of them, with some ham and tuna, too.
Jp
St. Bees, Ravenglass, Silloth prom. Skinburness. Put a bit o cucumber in,
Jp.
Edith
A bit of tinned salmon with that.
I usually have one in my fridge.

Jp
Norcot
2006-07-15 08:57:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by sleepalot
Being on top of the cliffs when the tide was in, he didn't
see anything either. ;-)
Edith.
We only had lunch on top of the cliffs. Later, we walked down to the sea and
to the rock shop.

Rex.
The Traveller
2006-07-15 09:12:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by The Traveller
Post by sleepalot
Being on top of the cliffs when the tide was in, he didn't
see anything either. ;-)
Edith.
We only had lunch on top of the cliffs. Later, we walked down to the sea and
to the rock shop.
Rex.
They sold rocks? Now who's lowering the tone.?

Edith.
a l l y
2006-07-15 09:54:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by Norcot
Post by The Traveller
Post by sleepalot
Being on top of the cliffs when the tide was in, he didn't
see anything either. ;-)
Edith.
We only had lunch on top of the cliffs. Later, we walked down to the sea
and
Post by Norcot
to the rock shop.
Rex.
They sold rocks? Now who's lowering the tone.?
I could have given him some rocks for free if I'd known.

ally
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:32:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by The Traveller
Post by Norcot
Post by The Traveller
Post by sleepalot
Being on top of the cliffs when the tide was in, he didn't
see anything either. ;-)
Edith.
We only had lunch on top of the cliffs. Later, we walked down to the sea
and
Post by Norcot
to the rock shop.
Rex.
They sold rocks? Now who's lowering the tone.?
I could have given him some rocks for free if I'd known.
ally
No comment :)9)
Norcot
2006-07-15 08:55:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by sleepalot
Post by Norcot
I slept like a log last night.
So your top half was dry then.
I couldn't sleep with a wet top half, Sleepy. Nor with a wet bottom for that
matter!

Rex.
The Traveller
2006-07-15 09:14:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by sleepalot
Post by Norcot
I slept like a log last night.
So your top half was dry then.
I couldn't sleep with a wet top half, Sleepy. Nor with a wet bottom for that
matter!
Rex.
Well, I hope you are not so old that you've started peeing the bed, me lad.
That's no more lemonade and drafty corners for you, mate.

Edith-No Visitor.
a l l y
2006-07-15 09:53:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by sleepalot
Being on top of the cliffs when the tide was in, he didn't
see anything either. ;-)
I expect he saw a lot of water and waves. And seagulls. I bet there were
seagulls.

ally-with-seagulls-nesting-on-roof
Norcot
2006-07-15 12:32:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by sleepalot
Being on top of the cliffs when the tide was in, he didn't
see anything either. ;-)
I expect he saw a lot of water and waves. And seagulls. I bet there were
seagulls.
ally-with-seagulls-nesting-on-roof
There were lots of black headed gulls. Earlier in the year there were
fulmars nesting in the cliffs.

Rex
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:37:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by a l l y
Post by sleepalot
Being on top of the cliffs when the tide was in, he didn't
see anything either. ;-)
I expect he saw a lot of water and waves. And seagulls. I bet there were
seagulls.
ally-with-seagulls-nesting-on-roof
There were lots of black headed gulls. Earlier in the year there were
fulmars nesting in the cliffs.
Rex
Did I tell you it's that time of the year when the seagulls fly round the
big hanging beach tree outside my verandah, flipping their wings on the
branches, chasing the bugs out, then eating them in mid air. One big white
gull made too much of a turn and almost swiped my head off one evening. They
start around 10 pm when it's quiet and dusky. What a feast they have.

Edith.
a l l y
2006-07-17 08:31:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Did I tell you it's that time of the year when the seagulls fly round the
big hanging beach tree outside my verandah, flipping their wings on the
branches, chasing the bugs out, then eating them in mid air. One big white
gull made too much of a turn and almost swiped my head off one evening. They
start around 10 pm when it's quiet and dusky. What a feast they have.
Seagulls, yes, dangerous beasts. I told you about the ones nesting on our
roof. The chicks are as big as their parents now, but still haven't taken
that final step off the roof and on to their wings. The parents (both known
as 'Harry' because they're always shouting, "Ha-ha-ha-ha") dive-bomb anyone
or anything that looks threatening in the back garden. They swoop down on
the dogs, missing their heads by inches, and dislike it intensely if you
stand in the middle of the cobbles looking up at them. I have to hide behind
a bush now if I want to watch them. They've nearly taken off with some of my
hair a few times. So far they've not attacked any of our customers thank
heavens.... They've also turned the water in the water butt into a
fish-scented brown liquid, which is probably highly-nutritious for feeding
the plants, but not very pleasant to handle, and no good for washing your
hands in.

..But..... I'll miss them when they've gone. I'm a big softie when it comes
to wildlife. It's what comes of growing up in a city, I guess.

ally
The Traveller
2006-07-17 08:44:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by The Traveller
Did I tell you it's that time of the year when the seagulls fly round the
big hanging beach tree outside my verandah, flipping their wings on the
branches, chasing the bugs out, then eating them in mid air. One big white
gull made too much of a turn and almost swiped my head off one evening. They
start around 10 pm when it's quiet and dusky. What a feast they have.
Seagulls, yes, dangerous beasts. I told you about the ones nesting on our
roof. The chicks are as big as their parents now, but still haven't taken
that final step off the roof and on to their wings. The parents (both known
as 'Harry' because they're always shouting, "Ha-ha-ha-ha") dive-bomb anyone
or anything that looks threatening in the back garden. They swoop down on
the dogs, missing their heads by inches, and dislike it intensely if you
stand in the middle of the cobbles looking up at them. I have to hide behind
a bush now if I want to watch them. They've nearly taken off with some of my
hair a few times. So far they've not attacked any of our customers thank
heavens.... They've also turned the water in the water butt into a
fish-scented brown liquid, which is probably highly-nutritious for feeding
the plants, but not very pleasant to handle, and no good for washing your
hands in.
..But..... I'll miss them when they've gone. I'm a big softie when it comes
to wildlife. It's what comes of growing up in a city, I guess.
ally
Edith, hiding behind the bushes with her rifle.

Edith Catapult
Norcot
2006-07-15 08:54:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Lol. If you didn't dip your toes, you haven't been there :oP
Edith Commenting.
Of course we dipped our toes and bought a stick of rock. What d'ya think
we are? Posh!
Rex
The Traveller
2006-07-15 09:16:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Lol. If you didn't dip your toes, you haven't been there :oP
Edith Commenting.
Of course we dipped our toes and bought a stick of rock. What d'ya think
we are? Posh!
Rex
Posh toff, that's what you are, with yer egg sandwiches and rolled up
trousers. Git yer legds shaved.

Edith Envioso
Norcot
2006-07-15 12:36:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by The Traveller
Of course we dipped our toes and bought a stick of rock. What d'ya think
we are? Posh!
Rex
Posh toff, that's what you are, with yer egg sandwiches and rolled up
trousers. Git yer legds shaved.
Edith Envioso
Egg sandwiches? We didn't have egg sandwiches. We had salad, chicken and
stuffing, sausage rolls and crusty bread rolls, with either chocolate
mousse or blackcurrant cheese cake for afters. We also had carrot and orange
cake. Non of your curly, dried up, sandwiches for us. We might not be posh
but we eat well.

Rex.
The Traveller
2006-07-15 13:24:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by The Traveller
Post by The Traveller
Of course we dipped our toes and bought a stick of rock. What d'ya think
we are? Posh!
Rex
Posh toff, that's what you are, with yer egg sandwiches and rolled up
trousers. Git yer legds shaved.
Edith Envioso
Egg sandwiches? We didn't have egg sandwiches. We had salad, chicken and
stuffing, sausage rolls and crusty bread rolls, with either chocolate
mousse or blackcurrant cheese cake for afters. We also had carrot and orange
cake. Non of your curly, dried up, sandwiches for us. We might not be posh
but we eat well.
Rex.
awwwwwwwww..... am gonna die.Can't you whisper into Erica's ear that I want
some of that and ask her to send a big hamper to me. ? Anyhow, you shouldn't
be eating such things.

Without me-Edith.
Jpinny
2006-07-15 14:50:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by The Traveller
Post by The Traveller
Of course we dipped our toes and bought a stick of rock. What d'ya think
we are? Posh!
Rex
Posh toff, that's what you are, with yer egg sandwiches and rolled up
trousers. Git yer legds shaved.
Edith Envioso
Egg sandwiches? We didn't have egg sandwiches. We had salad, chicken and
stuffing, sausage rolls and crusty bread rolls, with either chocolate
mousse or blackcurrant cheese cake for afters. We also had carrot and orange
cake. Non of your curly, dried up, sandwiches for us. We might not be posh
but we eat well.
Rex.
That sounds yummy, too.

Jp
a l l y
2006-07-15 09:58:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Lol. If you didn't dip your toes, you haven't been there :oP
Edith Commenting.
Of course we dipped our toes and bought a stick of rock. What d'ya think
we are? Posh!
Oh, *that* sort of rock!

ally
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:44:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Post by The Traveller
Lol. If you didn't dip your toes, you haven't been there :oP
Edith Commenting.
Of course we dipped our toes and bought a stick of rock. What d'ya think
we are? Posh!
Oh, *that* sort of rock!
ally
He's talking about his (Brighton rock) Ally. Or should I say boasting as
usual.

Edith Seagull Lady.

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOH................

I do like to be beside the seaside,
Oh I do like to be side the sea
Oh I do like to stroll along the prom prom prom
Where the bands do play, tiddely om pom pom

Malcolm Sergeant Southport pier cc 1950
a l l y
2006-07-15 10:00:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Well, we had a good day at the seaside.---( for the semantically
challenged we were at the side of a sea, the North Sea and there was no
beach as we sat on top of the Hunstanton cliffs and had lunch with the sea
pounding the base of the cliffs and no beach in sight. Beach :- an area
of sand gravel, mud etc covered and uncovered as the tide comes in and
goes out) The weather was good with a nice cooling easterly wind. The
picnic, which we packed ourselves, was excellent and the company was first
class. Even the traffic was light as the schools had not yet broken up for
the summer holidays ( Note; not summer recess, we are in England). I can
recommend a good, old fashionned, English, day at the seaside. I slept
like a log last night.
Sounds a bit like St Bees. Actually some of my favourite Scottish coastal
towns are, if not exactly beach-free, at least not known for their beaches.
Places with cliffs or rocks or little harbours, but not miles of sand. Sand
is boring compared to rocks.

ally
Norcot
2006-07-15 12:38:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by a l l y
Sounds a bit like St Bees. Actually some of my favourite Scottish coastal
towns are, if not exactly beach-free, at least not known for their
beaches. Places with cliffs or rocks or little harbours, but not miles of
sand. Sand is boring compared to rocks.
ally
The Hunstanton cliffs are mainly red sandstone - very red sandstone - with
a layer of white chalk on top. Very colourful. Unfortunately they are being
eroded at a great rate.

Rex.
Norcot
2006-07-15 12:43:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by a l l y
Sounds a bit like St Bees. Actually some of my favourite Scottish coastal
towns are, if not exactly beach-free, at least not known for their
beaches. Places with cliffs or rocks or little harbours, but not miles of
sand. Sand is boring compared to rocks.
ally
The Hunstanton cliffs are mainly red sandstone - very red sandstone - with
a layer of white chalk on top. Very colourful. Unfortunately they are
being eroded at a great rate.
Rex.
Try this website

http://www.enjoyengland.com/destinationguides/East_of_England/Destinations/hunstanton.aspx?bbcam=adwds&bbkid=Hunstanton&x
The Traveller
2006-07-15 13:35:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by Norcot
Post by a l l y
Sounds a bit like St Bees. Actually some of my favourite Scottish coastal
towns are, if not exactly beach-free, at least not known for their
beaches. Places with cliffs or rocks or little harbours, but not miles of
sand. Sand is boring compared to rocks.
ally
The Hunstanton cliffs are mainly red sandstone - very red sandstone - with
a layer of white chalk on top. Very colourful. Unfortunately they are
being eroded at a great rate.
Rex.
Try this website
http://www.enjoyengland.com/destinationguides/East_of_England/Destinations/h
unstanton.aspx?bbcam=adwds&bbkid=Hunstanton&x
Wow. Those cliffs are really something. Nice place, Rex. Just had my dinner.
Fish fingers, rice, salad.

Edith
Norcot
2006-07-15 15:04:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Wow. Those cliffs are really something. Nice place, Rex. Just had my dinner.
Fish fingers, rice, salad.
Edith
Glad you like the photograph of the cliffs at Hunstanton. We had a light
lunch of salad with sausage rolls today. Yesterday, when we were in
Norfolk, we also went to Burnham Market, a small village just inland, which
has a small family bakery. They make the most tasty sausage rolls. Hence the
bagfull we brought back with us. We've finished them off now. Must get back
to Norfolk soon!
The weather here is hot today. Not a cloud in the sky and just a little
breeze. Not the day to break any records or even do much. We did the
shopping very early, being at the farmers' market before 8am. Now we are
relaxing. Erica is catching up on some TV, I'm writing. Hope you have a
good weekend.

Rex.
The Traveller
2006-07-17 06:56:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by The Traveller
Wow. Those cliffs are really something. Nice place, Rex. Just had my dinner.
Fish fingers, rice, salad.
Edith
Glad you like the photograph of the cliffs at Hunstanton. We had a light
lunch of salad with sausage rolls today. Yesterday, when we were in
Norfolk, we also went to Burnham Market, a small village just inland, which
has a small family bakery. They make the most tasty sausage rolls. Hence the
bagfull we brought back with us. We've finished them off now. Must get back
to Norfolk soon!
The weather here is hot today. Not a cloud in the sky and just a little
breeze. Not the day to break any records or even do much. We did the
shopping very early, being at the farmers' market before 8am. Now we are
relaxing. Erica is catching up on some TV, I'm writing. Hope you have a
good weekend.
Rex.
Thank you, Rex. My weekend, Saturday all alone all day while my son and
Orlando showed son's Argentinian Cruise Ship guests the sights of Oslo while
I took prime time to paint.(out on my verandah. Verandah :0)
Sunday. Invited to son for coffee and cakes in the garden, sang Happy
Birthday to You, grandchild 8 years old and the wind blew the candles out on
his cake, to his dismay.
Afterwards, a run out into the country, sausages in potato cakes and a coke,
at a kiosk in Holmestrand, then home to crash.

Edith.
Norcot
2006-07-17 07:26:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Thank you, Rex. My weekend, Saturday all alone all day while my son and
Orlando showed son's Argentinian Cruise Ship guests the sights of Oslo while
I took prime time to paint.(out on my verandah. Verandah :0)
Sunday. Invited to son for coffee and cakes in the garden, sang Happy
Birthday to You, grandchild 8 years old and the wind blew the candles out on
his cake, to his dismay.
Afterwards, a run out into the country, sausages in potato cakes and a coke,
at a kiosk in Holmestrand, then home to crash.
Edith.
I think it will be home to crash all day today, Edith. It is forecast the
hottest day of the year at about 32degrees. Too much of a good thing!
Rex.
The Traveller
2006-07-17 08:20:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Thank you, Rex. My weekend, Saturday all alone all day while my son and
Orlando showed son's Argentinian Cruise Ship guests the sights of Oslo while
I took prime time to paint.(out on my verandah. Verandah :0)
Sunday. Invited to son for coffee and cakes in the garden, sang Happy
Birthday to You, grandchild 8 years old and the wind blew the candles
out
Post by The Traveller
on
his cake, to his dismay.
Afterwards, a run out into the country, sausages in potato cakes and a coke,
at a kiosk in Holmestrand, then home to crash.
Edith.
I think it will be home to crash all day today, Edith. It is forecast the
hottest day of the year at about 32degrees. Too much of a good thing!
Rex.
The winters are so long, I dare not complain about the heat here. I could
say, I must be the palest paleface on the block thou.

Edith in Shadow.
Norcot
2006-07-17 08:54:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by The Traveller
I think it will be home to crash all day today, Edith. It is forecast
the
Post by The Traveller
hottest day of the year at about 32degrees. Too much of a good thing!
Rex.
The winters are so long, I dare not complain about the heat here. I could
say, I must be the palest paleface on the block thou.
Edith in Shadow.
I try to stay pale and interesting but being red haired and blue eyed it
takes so little UV to redden my skin. It will defineitely be a stay in the
shade day today. Tomorrow is promised hotter still!!!! But we might get
thunder storms - hurrah! I love thunder storms, as long as they don't
strike me.

Rex.
Jpinny
2006-07-15 14:55:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by Norcot
Post by a l l y
Sounds a bit like St Bees. Actually some of my favourite Scottish coastal
towns are, if not exactly beach-free, at least not known for their
beaches. Places with cliffs or rocks or little harbours, but not miles of
sand. Sand is boring compared to rocks.
ally
The Hunstanton cliffs are mainly red sandstone - very red sandstone - with
a layer of white chalk on top. Very colourful. Unfortunately they are
being eroded at a great rate.
Rex.
Try this website
http://www.enjoyengland.com/destinationguides/East_of_England/Destinations/hunstanton.aspx?bbcam=adwds&bbkid=Hunstanton&x
Very distinctive. Sunny Hunny looks nice. Not much we can do against
wind and water, is there. It's ironic that erosion is responsible for
quite a lot of beauty in the world.

Jp
Norcot
2006-07-15 15:13:51 UTC
Permalink
Very distinctive. Sunny Hunny looks nice. Not much we can do against wind
and water, is there. It's ironic that erosion is responsible for quite a
lot of beauty in the world.
Jp
It's strange that mankind sees beauty in what is just the natural processes
of nature. I wonder if primitive man saw it like that? Could it just be a
nostalgia thing?

Rex.
sleepalot
2006-07-15 22:44:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Very distinctive. Sunny Hunny looks nice. Not much we can do against wind
and water, is there. It's ironic that erosion is responsible for quite a
lot of beauty in the world.
Jp
It's strange that mankind sees beauty in what is just the natural processes
of nature. I wonder if primitive man saw it like that? Could it just be a
nostalgia thing?
Rex.
I think primitive man spent a lot more time at the beach.
(From say 50,000 to 20,000 BCE.) Western Europe would've
been one giant forest, with huge swamps to the north - pretty
much inpenetrable.

If you go for a tramp in the woods (oo-er), and think about what
you might eat - if you had to: there really isn't very much there.
Mushrooms (seasonal), a few nuts, berries and seeds (seasonal),
a few herbs. Animals are scarce - moreso now than back then -
and as difficult to catch as ever (but back then, animals were as
likely to catch you!).

Now head for the beach, and look there. Straightaway, you can
find shell-fish and seaweed all year round. You only have to go
a little way inland for all those forest resources (and fresh water).
Also, it's a lot easier (and safer) to travel along the coastline.
a l l y
2006-07-15 20:09:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by Norcot
Post by a l l y
Sounds a bit like St Bees. Actually some of my favourite Scottish
coastal towns are, if not exactly beach-free, at least not known for
their beaches. Places with cliffs or rocks or little harbours, but not
miles of sand. Sand is boring compared to rocks.
ally
The Hunstanton cliffs are mainly red sandstone - very red sandstone -
with a layer of white chalk on top. Very colourful. Unfortunately they
are being eroded at a great rate.
Rex.
Try this website
http://www.enjoyengland.com/destinationguides/East_of_England/Destinations/hunstanton.aspx?bbcam=adwds&bbkid=Hunstanton&x
Now those are very interesting cliffs. I bet the local geologists could tell
us a thing or two about them.

ally
sleepalot
2006-07-16 00:35:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Well, we had a good day at the seaside.---( for the semantically challenged
we were at the side of a sea, the North Sea and there was no beach as we sat
on top of the Hunstanton cliffs and had lunch with the sea pounding the base
of the cliffs and no beach in sight. Beach :- an area of sand gravel, mud
etc covered and uncovered as the tide comes in and goes out) The weather
was good with a nice cooling easterly wind. The picnic, which we packed
ourselves, was excellent and the company was first class. Even the traffic
was light as the schools had not yet broken up for the summer holidays (
Note; not summer recess, we are in England). I can recommend a good, old
fashionned, English, day at the seaside. I slept like a log last night.
Rex.
Chalk soils are a good place to look for orchids.
Did you notice any unusual plants?
Norcot
2006-07-16 07:12:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by sleepalot
Post by Norcot
Well, we had a good day at the seaside.---( for the semantically challenged
we were at the side of a sea, the North Sea and there was no beach as we sat
on top of the Hunstanton cliffs and had lunch with the sea pounding the base
of the cliffs and no beach in sight. Beach :- an area of sand gravel, mud
etc covered and uncovered as the tide comes in and goes out) The weather
was good with a nice cooling easterly wind. The picnic, which we packed
ourselves, was excellent and the company was first class. Even the traffic
was light as the schools had not yet broken up for the summer holidays (
Note; not summer recess, we are in England). I can recommend a good, old
fashionned, English, day at the seaside. I slept like a log last night.
Rex.
Chalk soils are a good place to look for orchids.
Did you notice any unusual plants?
Norfolk is so sandy and dry that the flora is very different to ours, even
though its only some 50 miles to the east of us. I did not see any orchids
though. Lots of very deep blue scabious, lots of willow herb.

Rex.
The Traveller
2006-07-16 07:25:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by sleepalot
Post by Norcot
Well, we had a good day at the seaside.---( for the semantically challenged
we were at the side of a sea, the North Sea and there was no beach as
we
Post by Norcot
Post by sleepalot
Post by Norcot
sat
on top of the Hunstanton cliffs and had lunch with the sea pounding the base
of the cliffs and no beach in sight. Beach :- an area of sand gravel, mud
etc covered and uncovered as the tide comes in and goes out) The weather
was good with a nice cooling easterly wind. The picnic, which we packed
ourselves, was excellent and the company was first class. Even the traffic
was light as the schools had not yet broken up for the summer holidays (
Note; not summer recess, we are in England). I can recommend a good, old
fashionned, English, day at the seaside. I slept like a log last night.
Rex.
Chalk soils are a good place to look for orchids.
Did you notice any unusual plants?
Norfolk is so sandy and dry that the flora is very different to ours, even
though its only some 50 miles to the east of us. I did not see any orchids
though. Lots of very deep blue scabious, lots of willow herb.
Rex.
Sea pinks always gave me a thrill. I believe you can buy (cultivated ?) ones
to plant in your gardens now. Takes the thrill out of it.

Edith Bouquet not Bucket
Norcot
2006-07-16 09:39:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by Norcot
Norfolk is so sandy and dry that the flora is very different to ours, even
though its only some 50 miles to the east of us. I did not see any orchids
though. Lots of very deep blue scabious, lots of willow herb.
Rex.
Sea pinks always gave me a thrill. I believe you can buy (cultivated ?) ones
to plant in your gardens now. Takes the thrill out of it.
Edith Bouquet not Bucket
Sea Pinks, Is that a common name for Thrift, Edith? We also saw a lot of
Great Mullein over in Norfolk, That's a type of verbascum, which we don't
get here in Rutland. It's tall yellow spikes grow on the verges. When the
kids were small we used to holiday in Norfolk regularly as it was a
reasonably short drive for us (& them!) From memory we spent about 10
consecutive years at the same cottage there on Peddar's Way. We chose it
this last week because we took Erica's parents with us. They don't like
sitting for too long in the car, either.
Norfolk is famous for its lavender fields. Lavender is another plant that
prefers dry conditions. Caley Mill - where they extract the oil from the
flowers, is thriving these days. We called there on our way back home. The
sun was shining and the heat filled the air with lavender perfume from the
flower beds.


Rex.
Norcot
2006-07-16 09:43:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Norfolk is famous for its lavender fields. Lavender is another plant that
prefers dry conditions. Caley Mill - where they extract the oil from the
flowers, is thriving these days. We called there on our way back home. The
sun was shining and the heat filled the air with lavender perfume from the
flower beds.
Rex.
http://www.sisley.co.uk/lavender.htm Click on Caley Mill if you want
and idea of the place.

Rex.
a l l y
2006-07-16 12:16:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by Norcot
Norfolk is famous for its lavender fields. Lavender is another plant that
prefers dry conditions. Caley Mill - where they extract the oil from the
flowers, is thriving these days. We called there on our way back home.
The sun was shining and the heat filled the air with lavender perfume
from the flower beds.
Rex.
http://www.sisley.co.uk/lavender.htm Click on Caley Mill if you want
and idea of the place.
Wonderful. Pity they had to scan the photo from some old newspaper cutting
rather than getting the original, though. I'd love to see the colours in all
their glory.

I had lavender growing in my garden for several years until we got the male
dog.... (He has methodically killed most of the plants of that
height...<sigh>) I didn't know it preferred dry conditions. Seemed to thrive
all right here in the soggy Cumbrian climate.

ally
The Traveller
2006-07-17 07:26:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Post by Norcot
Norfolk is famous for its lavender fields. Lavender is another plant that
prefers dry conditions. Caley Mill - where they extract the oil from the
flowers, is thriving these days. We called there on our way back home. The
sun was shining and the heat filled the air with lavender perfume from the
flower beds.
Rex.
http://www.sisley.co.uk/lavender.htm Click on Caley Mill if you want
and idea of the place.
Rex.
Oh. WoW! What am I missing.

Edith.
The Traveller
2006-07-17 07:23:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
Post by The Traveller
Post by Norcot
Norfolk is so sandy and dry that the flora is very different to ours, even
though its only some 50 miles to the east of us. I did not see any orchids
though. Lots of very deep blue scabious, lots of willow herb.
Rex.
Sea pinks always gave me a thrill. I believe you can buy (cultivated ?) ones
to plant in your gardens now. Takes the thrill out of it.
Edith Bouquet not Bucket
http://www.naturedirect2u.com/Medicinal%20herbs/willowherb.htm

So this is the willow flower. They grow from the north to the south pole and
in all countries. They are in bloom here in Norway at the moment and light
up the country side with the mosy beautiful shade. I never knew the name of
them until now.
Post by The Traveller
Sea Pinks, Is that a common name for Thrift, Edith?
Just a minute. I'll see if I can find out.
http://www.dolphinhousegallery.co.uk/flowers2.htm#springs Yes.

My mother used to put lavender in our drawer.Oh, I must have a lavender
plant.

Edith.
Norcot
2006-07-17 07:27:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Traveller
My mother used to put lavender in our drawer.Oh, I must have a lavender
plant.
Edith.
We had a pine bedding box which always had a lavender bag pinned in the
top of it.
Rex.
Johnny
2006-07-16 15:10:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Norcot
Well, we had a good day at the seaside.---( for the semantically
challenged we were at the side of a sea, the North Sea and there was
no beach as we sat on top of the Hunstanton cliffs and had lunch with
the sea pounding the base of the cliffs and no beach in sight. Beach
:- an area of sand gravel, mud etc covered and uncovered as the tide
comes in and goes out) The weather was good with a nice cooling
easterly wind. The picnic, which we packed ourselves, was excellent
and the company was first class. Even the traffic was light as the
schools had not yet broken up for the summer holidays ( Note; not
summer recess, we are in England). I can recommend a good, old
fashionned, English, day at the seaside. I slept like a log last night.
Rex.
By 'weather was good' do you mean it was only occasional light rain?

Johnny-spent-yesterday-at-the-riverside
Norcot
2006-07-16 17:01:54 UTC
Permalink
"Johnny" <***@ominous.portent> wrote in message news:

I can recommend a good, old
Post by Johnny
Post by Norcot
fashionned, English, day at the seaside. I slept like a log last night.
Rex.
By 'weather was good' do you mean it was only occasional light rain?
Johnny-spent-yesterday-at-the-riverside
Sky all over blue. Sun out all day. Temperature up in the high 70's -(old
money) Just what summer ought to be.

Rex
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...